3 Hot Jobs in Pharma: June 2017 Part 2

Every month, our vacancy page is packed with exciting jobs up for grabs from some of the biggest names in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

As always, we’re sharing three highlights to give you a taste of the hottest opportunities available right now.

Regional Account Manager (Diabetes)

A wholly owned subsidiary of Japan’s largest pharmaceutical company with more than 30,000 employees in 70 countries seek a talented individual to lead the delivery of a local business plan. This is a role that will provide the incumbent with true ownership of their local business, where you will create your own business plan and be 100% accountable for the achievement of your sales targets. You will be excited by this stand alone role where you have the opportunity to manage your own business by creating your own local “franchise”. Excellent Basic + healthcare + pension + bonus.

Location: Northern Ireland

Apply Now


Neurology Sales Manager (Primary Care)

A world-class company that offers their products in over 150 countries worldwide have an exciting opportunity to join their Neurology in a key management role. This role will be responsible for managing their team of Key Account Managers across the geography outlined above. Your suitabilty for the role will be defined by your previous line management experience, ideally from a specialist therapy background. Excellent Basic + healthcare + pension + bonus

Location: Northern England, Scotland

Apply Now


Business Development Manager (Pharma Services)

Our client is part of an International PLC and employs over 140 staff and is delivering an enviable and unrivalled portfolio of healthcare intelligence products and services. In summary you would be responsible for managing a field based Business Development team, who will be selling the company’s full range of Solutions into targeted Pharmaceutical Companies. Therefore you will need to have experience in Sales Management, be a proven sales leader and be comfortable working across Marketing, Medical, Sales and Business Intelligence functions. The role will come with a Highly Competitive Basic Salary, Bonus and Benefits package.

Location: South UK

Apply Now

3 Hot Jobs in Healthcare: June 2017 Part 2

Every month, our vacancy page is packed with exciting jobs up for grabs from some of the biggest names in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

As always, we’re sharing three highlights to give you a taste of the hottest opportunities available right now.

Territory Manager (Laparascopic)

Our client is a major player in the single-use theatre device market, across the UK and Europe and the United States. At this important time for the organisation, they are looking for an highly motivated and talented territory manager to join their high performing UK sales team to work covering the Cambridgeshire / E Anglia territory. The ideal candidate will have medical device (operating theatre) experience and a proven track record of sales success. In this role you will manage the territory as a ‘business within a business’. You can expect a very attractive financial and benefits package and the chance to represent a genuine market leader in it’s field with major growth plans for the next few years.

Location: Cambridge & East Anglia

Apply Now


Territory Manager (Continence Care)

Our client is a multinational Healthcare company with a range of unique highly patient focussed products. The company have an exciting position to work in their Continence Division covering the South East and your key customers would include Urology Nurses and Continence Care Advisors in the hospital and community setting.

Location: Kent

Apply Now


Regional Sales Manager (Animal Health)

A renowned pharmaceutical company are looking for a highly motivated Regional Manager, who can inspire and drive a team. You must have strong interpersonal skills and ability to build strong relationships with customers. Reporting in to the Business Unit Director, this role is primarily responsible for achieving the annual sales and business objectives within a regional geography through a team of Account Managers by coordinating the development, implementation and monitoring of the Territory Plans, ensuring alignment with Business Unit objectives, while maximizing the marketing contribution for the overall business. This employer of choice offers an excellent basic salary, competitive bonus and benefits package.

Location: Northern UK

Apply Now

3 Hot Jobs in Pharma: June 2017 Part 1

Every month, our vacancy page is packed with exciting jobs up for grabs from some of the biggest names in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

As always, we’re sharing three highlights to give you a taste of the hottest opportunities available right now.

Market Access Manager (Respiratory)

This role will be a mixture of Field based and approximately 3 days per week in the Cambridge Head Office. Our client is well known within the Pain and Respiratory fields, and are an exceptional company to work for. Their culture and values underpin everything they do and individuals are encouraged and supported to develop in their careers. There is an Excellent Basic Salary and Highly Competitive Benefits Package available. To find out what the job requirements are, click ‘Apply Now’ below.

Location: Based South

Apply Now


Exciting Opportunity – Pharmaceutical Account Manager (Primary Care)

You will be a respiratory therapy and disease expert working across a specific geography within primary care, responsible and accountable for the customers and the performance of that geography. You must be comfortable being held accountable for the performance of a territory. Intellectually nimble and capable of keeping knowledge levels high across disease, own product, competitors, campaign and environment. Ideally you will have a proven track record of achievement in sales and a life science degree. A Highly Competitive Basic Salary, Company Car, Benefits Package and Bonus will be offered.

Location: Suffolk

Apply Now


Key Account Manager (Dermatology)

A leading independent and family owned Pharmaceutical organisation within Dermatology and Critical Care has a new opportunity for a Dermatology Account Manager which will afford full responsibility and accountability for driving and managing all the Dermatology business. You will target specific business critical accounts to drive sales growth via market access and advocate development and will enjoy freedom to liaise with key customers and stakeholders within secondary care, primary care and across the broader local health economy. Excellent salary, competitive bonus and benefits will be offered.

Location: Republic of Ireland

Apply Now

How to Hand in Your Notice

Once you’ve decided to move on from your current job and you’re ready to hand in your notice, you need to do this in a thoughtful and considered way to ensure you retain your reputation with your current employer and peer group. Regardless of whether you’re feeling torn about leaving or simply cannot wait to get on your way, you need to remain professional as you never know when you might need a reference or even work for the Company (or manager) again.

People say the world is a small place, and at CHASE we know that this is very true of the UK Pharma and Healthcare industries. As the UK Pharma’s biggest permanent and fastest growing Contract Sales Organisation, we have exceptional insight into the best way to hand in your notice.

1. Take one last look at what you’re about to do

After the stress of the job interview, assessment processes and the euphoria and ‘honour’ of being selected as the chosen one, it’s pretty difficult to be objective one last time about why you’re doing what you’re doing. But you must find a way, even at the end.

Force yourself to write down a list of all the reasons why you want the new job, (without mentioning all the reasons you do not want your current job) and counter balance them with the downsides of changing jobs. Once you’ve done this talk them through with a friend or loved one and ask them to really challenge you on these reasons to make sure you’re being really objective. Then, go to sleep and see how you feel in the morning.

If you’re still excited then you know what to do – if not then you need to talk this through again and ask yourself what the potential concerns are. You can always revisit them with your recruitment consultant if you’re having doubts. This is your life so don’t feel obliged to do anything that’s not right for you.

2. Never hand in your notice until you have received a written offer

Whilst the temptation may be to resign when you get a verbal offer, never do so until you have received an offer letter and contract of employment from your new employer. To do would leave yourself at risk. Whilst it is rare for verbal offers to be retracted it can happen (e.g. a global recruitment freeze is imposed just before your offer is formally issued).

You can ask the Company to email you the information as that can speed up the process. When you receive the written offer read it carefully and go back quickly with any questions before resigning. Now is the time for clarification and questions on contractual matters – not after you’ve started. Once you’re happy, sign on the dotted line and now it’s time to hand in your resignation.

3. Get to work on your letter of resignation

In your letter you don’t need to go into too much detail, other than to formally offer your resignation and perhaps make mention of how this has been a difficult decision and how much you’ve enjoyed your time at Company X.

It’s also really important to be clear about when your ideal last day will be, and try and deliver a proper handover for your current employer.

If you do have annual leave left to take discuss with your current employer what your options are and come to a mutually beneficial arrangement. Whatever your situation your notice period is contractually binding, so stay professional to the end.

4. Talk it through – ideally face to face

Even if you’re 100% sure you’re leaving, where possible you should give your employer (and especially your manager) the chance to discuss your decision and motivations behind it.

This will often be a tricky conversation, but it is important to do these things properly as one day there’s a chance you’ll cross paths again or even need a reference.

During this meeting it’s important you prepare well and go into it with a clear logical set of thoughts. You should also refrain from mentioning anything negative that could prove to be destructive further down the line.

5. Dealing with a counter offer

If you’ve been a star performer over a number of years, you might find that you get a counter offer of either more money or job enlargement. If this does happen you should carefully consider everything one more time before officially signing off.

If the counter offer suddenly plugs a major gap in your reasoning for taking the new job then you should most definitely agree to think about the counter offer and discuss it with a trusted friend.

If on the other hand the counter offer is ‘a bit more money’ or a ‘promise you’re next in line for a promotion’ then these things might not truly give you what you’re looking for. Sure it’s great if the company is prepared to fight to keep you, however don’t get caught up in the flattery. You can only work with what you’ve got in writing.

Whatever happens do not make decisions in the moment. Ask for time to think about the counter offer and if you decide to turn it down make sure you once again explain your reasoning and thank them for their efforts to keep you.

6. Create a solid handover plan

As soon as your resignation has been accepted the next step is to start putting a handover plan in place. You should do this by bringing a list of tasks, projects and initiatives to the table and asking your manager what they would like you to do with them.

Reinforce your commitment to doing what it takes to give them all of the information they need to pass onto your replacement, including being willing to take phone calls or emails after you’ve left to clarify any outstanding issues or concerns.

Make sure you document everything that’s being asked of you in a single email to your manager and ask them if there’s anything missing. Then get to work collating the required information and sending it over to your manager for feedback and approval.

7. What if you get put on ‘Gardening’ leave

For those of you who are moving to a competitor there’s a chance you might be asked to go on Gardening Leave – i.e. see out your notice without doing any more work.

If this happens to you you’re still going to need to provide a hand over of some description and possibly be available at short notice to meet up with your manager or company representative.

In these circumstances use the time to recharge your batteries and get your head into a really positive frame of mind about how successful you’re going to be in your next job.

You might also want to take on a small project such as training for a running event or giving one of your rooms at home a make-over. Either way don’t waste your time. It’s not often in your lifetime you’ll get to have several weeks of time being paid for very little work!

8. Follow up before you start your new job

The last piece of advice I have to give is that whatever the circumstances you’re leaving under you should definitely follow up with your current manager and team mates once last time prior to starting your new job.

This is your final chance to tie up loose ends, gather people’s contact details for the future and agree to keep in touch.

When you do speak to them keep positive about your reasons for leaving and hand over work with pride, and in a clear and professional manner.

If you’d like to arrange a confidential discussion to explore your career options, please email your CV over to connect@chasepeople.com or call us on 0131 553 6644 and we can take it from there.

Kirstie Justice
Senior Recruitment Consultant; East & West Midlands inc. Northampton

3 Hot Jobs in Healthcare: June 2017 Part 1

Every month, our vacancy page is packed with exciting jobs up for grabs from some of the biggest names in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

As always, we’re sharing three highlights to give you a taste of the hottest opportunities available right now.

UK & Ireland Marketing Manager (Aesthetics)

An innovative healthcare company with a strong global presence is seeking an interim Marketing Manager (12 month FTC) who will be working with their successful Aesthetics portfolio and have responsibility for the UK marketplace. You will have responsibility for 4x direct reports so some leadership experience is essential. The role will have overall marketing responsibility for their key aesthetics brands across the UK, and also focus on a major new launch in 2018. The ideal candidate will have 2-3 years’ experience in medical aesthetics and a track record of people and performance development.

Location: UK & Ireland

Apply Now


UK Business Manager (Medical Devices)

A rapidly expanding medical device company seeks a UK Business Manager to spearhead their UK business, managing a team of Account Managers across the UK and be responsible for the bottom line. The company is in a major growth phase with ambitious plans for the next few years. As it’s a business critical role, the ideal candidate will be an experienced medical device industry professional with demonstrable sales management and marketing experience. You can expect an excellent financial package, with an excellent incentives scheme and also have the chance to represent a people-focused business that invests heavily in R&D and employees.

Location: UK

Apply Now


Territory Manager (Laparoscopic Devices)

A major player in the single-use theatre device market, operating across the UK, Europe and US, is looking for an highly motivated and talented territory manager to join their high performing UK sales team to work covering the Kent territory.  In this brand new role you will manage the territory as a ‘business within a business’. You will also be degree qualified and be able to demonstrate a track record of delivering success from a sales perspective. You can expect a very attractive financial and benefits package and the chance to represent a genuine market leader in it’s field with major growth plans for the next few years.

Location: Kent

Apply Now

Negotiating a Job Offer

Negotiating a Job Offer

So you’ve received an offer for the job you really want and everything about the role and the opportunities it will bring have ticked all the boxes. However there is one last thing you’re not comfortable with; the salary is lower than you expected.

What will you do? Every situation in Pharma and Healthcare is unique, however there are similarities you can learn about and leverage if you’re really not happy with the offer you’ve been given. Let’s take a look at your options;

Make sure you’ve got a clear idea of the remuneration range before you get an offer

We discussed this principle in our most recent blog, highlighting that money isn’t the most important factor, however it’s usually the last thing to be agreed.

Therefore before you get to offer stage, and ideally before you even apply for the job, you should have a clear idea of the potential pay range the employer is willing to consider.

If the offer is at the top end of the range then negotiations are going to be tricky and you might need to be realistic about the likelihood of the employer breaking their desired pay scale to bring you on board.

Don’t negotiate just for the sake of it

If you’ve been offered something which you’re genuinely happy with then don’t get greedy. Thank them for the offer and tell them how excited you are to get started. The hiring manager will see through you straight away if you’re just negotiating for the sake of it and it won’t lead to a good start to life with the new company. They might even withdraw the offer which is definitely not a good outcome, so think carefully before you start this process off.

Leverage your recruiter

We also mentioned in the last blog that your recruiter can be a great resource when it comes to negotiating the package. Not only will they likely have a stronger relationship with the hiring manager (as they will have dealt with them more than you in the past) they can also provide credible comparisons between your skill set compared to the rest of the candidates in the market right now. This does go both ways though so if your recruiter is telling you not to push the negotiations beyond a certain point then you need to take this advice as the chances are there’s another suitable candidate willing to take the role for the salary on offer.

Consider the whole deal and discuss multiple issues at the same time

If however you’re genuinely disappointed with the offer and you want or even need to negotiate then you should really consider the whole deal on offer and be prepared to negotiate multiple issues at the same time.

Start by writing down your desired package line by line then match this up to the offer to help compare the full package. You should also rank each item in terms of importance to you and choose which to focus on within the negotiations.

The final stage before you negotiate is to sense check your expectations. Again your recruitment consultant can really advise you here as they’ll know what’s negotiable, however nine times out of ten it will likely only be your base salary that you’ll be able to negotiate. This is the time to get things agreed to make sure you’re happy and this new job is going to work for you.

Be clear on why you would like more (and why it’s important to you)

You can’t just ask for a bigger number without rationalising and expect the right response. If you have logic and emotion in your reasoning then it becomes much easier to see things from your perspective. For example you might be waiting on the results from your latest pay review and are fully expecting your basic salary to rise by x%.

Let them know you really want the job!

Taking this stance means the employer knows you really want this job so they’ll know the deal is close. This is a good position to be in as everyone has already put so much into this so it would be a huge wasted opportunity if you both had to start all over again. And after all who doesn’t like ‘sealing the deal’?

Keep the big picture in mind

If you find you’re not getting the responses you want then you need to simply keep your cool and more importantly your sense of perspective. If you’re close to the number you want and genuinely believe this job is going to do more for your long term career prospects than your current role then it could be worth accepting the offer and taking the plunge. If however you think the offer will continue to bug you if you ‘sell yourself short’ then you need to hold your ground, knowing that the chances are there’s another job out there which could pay you more if this one doesn’t.

The other consideration is if you’re out of work now (or about to become out of work) then you have a different set of thoughts to consider. On one hand your current salary is actually zero (or about to be), so unless you’ve got a list of job offers with your previous salary on offer to fall back on then take care with falling into the trap of expecting to be paid what your last role paid you. It doesn’t always work like that.

If negotiations don’t work now ask them how to get to where you want to be

If all else fails in your quest to negotiate a higher rate of pay but you really want this job then the final thing to do is ask the hiring manager how you can get to where you want to be.

For example, ask them about the objectives you’ll have to work to and when your first pay review will be.

Handle with Care

However, remember that all job offers are precious and should be handled with care. Being in Sales and Marketing means that negotiating is an accepted part of what you do, but so is being perceptive and knowing what a good offer looks like!

Good luck!

If you’d like to know more and arrange a confidential discussion to explore your career options, please email your CV over to connect@chasepeople.com or call us on 0131 553 6644.

Clare Jones
Senior Recruitment Consultant; North West / North Wales / Yorkshire

3 hot jobs in Pharma: May 2017 Part 3

Every month, our vacancy page is packed with exciting jobs up for grabs from some of the biggest names in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

As always, we’re sharing three highlights to give you a taste of the hottest opportunities available right now.

Brand Lead (Respiratory)

A world class Pharmaceutical Organisation needs a Brand Lead to work on a highly successful Respiratory brand. You will support the development of brand strategy and lead the implementation of tactics through the Account teams. You will also be responsible for the delivery of sales and customer value within defined resources. Accountable for all marketing team deliverables for key brand including area plan, tactical plan and support to local account-based working. You must have proven Marketing experience and success, as well as excellent analytical and project management skills. A Highly Competitive Basic Salary and Excellent Flexible Benefits package and Bonus will be paid.

Location: Home counties

Apply Now


Customer Account Specialist (Diabetes)

A wholly owned subsidiary of Japan’s largest pharmaceutical company seek a talented individual to assist in the delivery of a local business plan through close interaction with key customers groups in primary care. This is a highly autonomous role that will suit a candidate with an entrepreneurial approach and exceptional commercial acumen, probably frustrated by the limitations of their current role. Your suitabilty for the role will be defined by your previous extensive success in a primary care setting from within the UK Pharmaceutical industry. Excellent Basic + healthcare + pension + 20% bonus and car allowance.

Location: Manchester / Stockport

Apply Now


Graduate Opportunity! Key Account Manager (GI)

A small sized internationally established Pharmaceutical company seeks an Account Manager to promote the company’s products to gastroenterologists and specialist nurses, ensuring product listing on hospital and primary care formularies, and assisting in developing the Company’s business offering to physicians, and patients and to the NHS. This is intended to be a wide ranging role that requires people who can work at both a hospital and market access level. Excellent salary plus bonus and benefits, please call 0131 553 6644 for more information

Location: Aberdeen

Apply Now

Effective Job Offer Management

Should I Accept this Job Offer?

When you’ve put everything into applying for a role it is great news when you hear that you’ve been successful and are to be offered. However accepting a new job is a big, potentially life changing, decision so it’s critical that you have prepared for this moment.

Regardless of whether you’re in the early part of your career looking for the next step or a senior executive who is out of work because of a recent restructure here are some pointers that I always urge my candidates to think about;

Make sure you’ve got a clear idea of the remuneration range before you get an offer

Money isn’t the most important factor, however it’s usually the last thing to be agreed. Having a clear idea of the potential salary prior to you applying for a job is critical. If you don’t, this presents a risk for both parties that there could be mis-matched expectations which at the very end of the recruitment process means all the time and effort (on both sides) goes to waste.

Your recruiter can be a great resource here and will be able to advise you at the start of the process. This also requires transparency and trust from your side too and my advice is to have shared a salary range that you’d be happy to negotiate between.

Salary shouldn’t be something you proactively raise during the interview process, however if you are asked then you need to be honest and give a sensible range.

Take your research to the next level

You should already have a strong base understanding of the Company and job you’re applying for prior to going into an interview, however once you’ve had each interview there should be clues and questions that come up for you to allow you to dig even further.

This might be something about the Company, market place they operate in, product or even about the people who work there.

One of the biggest mistakes people can make is not finding out enough about their potential employer. Put some thought into what’s really important and look for information about the company performance, the market place dynamics, culture and potential team mates (all of this is on the internet in some form, or failing that carefully ask some trusted peers what they think).

Objectively assess the offer

Once you’ve been given your offer, create some thinking space and make a list of all of the things you think are important in a job, write them down and ask yourself how this job offers does and does not fit the bill.

If all else fails listen to your gut feeling!

If after all of this research and consideration you’re still not sure which road to go down, then it’s probably best you go with your gut feeling. If it feels right and the people around you are in agreement with your assessment of the situation then you’re probably about to make a good decision.

Consult with your family and friends what the pros and cons are as you see (or feel) them. Ask their views, but at the end of the day you need to be the one who makes the final decision. You know yourself and the opportunities you have better than anyone, and you’re the one who has to live by the choices you make.

Consider the whole deal.

To many people, “negotiating a job offer” and “negotiating a salary” are synonymous. But much of your satisfaction from the job will come from other factors you can negotiate—perhaps even more easily than salary. Don’t get fixated on money. Focus on the value of the entire deal: responsibilities, location, travel, flexibility in work hours, opportunities for growth and promotion, perks, support for continued education, and so forth. Think not just about how you’re willing to be rewarded but also when. You may decide to chart a course that pays less handsomely now but will put you in a stronger position later.

If you decide to say no

Saying no to a job offer can be very challenging. You’ll have put everything into getting this offer and you must at some point have really wanted the job as any lack of passion (especially for a sales job) would have resulted in a red flag earlier in the recruitment process.

As a professional you’re also likely to have sense of guilt if you want to turn down the offer but you need to remove yourself from any such emotion and stay objective and true to yourself.

If you come to the realisation prior to being offered the job that you’re going to turn it down then it would be best for you to withdraw at that point and save everyone some time, however if you’re unsure then it is fine to keep going.

If you do say no, it’s important that you do so professionally. Everyone has the right to say no thank you, but you need to do this properly as you may want to work for that Company, or Manager, in the future! A really important point is do not sit on a decision for days. Make an informed decision quickly and don’t put off awkward conversations.

Good luck!

If you’d like to know more and arrange a confidential discussion to explore your career options, please email your CV over to connect@chasepeople.com or call us on 0131 553 6644.

Victoria Henderson
Recruitment Consultant; Scotland/North East England/Northern Ireland

3 hot jobs in Pharma: May 2017 Part 2

Every month, our vacancy page is packed with exciting jobs up for grabs from some of the biggest names in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

As always, we’re sharing three highlights to give you a taste of the hottest opportunities available right now.

Brand Lead (Respiratory)

A world class Pharmaceutical Organisation has an exciting role for a Brand Lead to work on a highly successful Respiratory brand. You will support the development of brand strategy and lead the implementation of tactics through the Account teams. You must have proven Marketing experience and success, as well as excellent analytical and project management skills. A Highly Competitive Basic Salary and Excellent Flexible Benefits package and Bonus will be paid.

Location: Home counties

Apply Now


Key Account Manager (Diabetes)

A world class Pharmaceutical Organisation has an exciting role for a Diabetes Key Account Manager working within their industry leading team. You will work as part of a cross-functional team, selling to Key Customers in Primary Care, the Payer community and clinical prescribers in Hospitals. You must be able to demonstrate a successful track-record of selling within the NHS Hospital environment in the UK. Our client offers an award winning people development environment, where your ambitions and aspirations can be truly realised. Excellent Salary, bonus, substantial flexible lifestyle benefits package.

Location: Cheshire / Mersey

Apply Now


Hospital Key Account Manager (Haematology)

Our Client is a leading Biotechnology Company with a product that combats a rare, disabling, and life-threatening blood disorder. Currently looking for a Regional Account Manager with experience in High-Cost medication and funding streams. The ideal candidate will have at least 5 years’ experience of hospital sales, preferably in niche markets/orphan drugs and previous experience in key account management. Excellent Salary and full package will be offered.

Location: London & East of England

Apply Now

Body Language for Interviews

Smart job seekers not only know how to prepare and what to say in an interview setting, but they also know how to manage their non-verbal communication, aka their body language.

So, you might be schooled up and aware of how your body language looks, or this could be a new subject for you. Either way, this blog will cover the key points you need to know to ensure you use the optimal body language to give yourself the best chance of success.

First impressions

You should be trying to create an air of confidence and calm, but not arrogance, so before you leave for your job interview give yourself plenty of time and make sure you’ve got everything you’re going to possibly need; copy of CV and cover letter, job description, note pad, pens etc.

Put them in a professional looking satchel, briefcase or bag so that you’re not scrambling things together in your car prior to walking into the building. And by the way, always assume that there will be people watching you as soon as you park your car!

The other thing to be aware of is that hiring managers often ask the people you’ve had brief engagements with what they thought about you. So for example if you speak to somebody on the front reception desk make sure you treat them like the final decision maker by being friendly and polite. They’ll also be judging your non-visual communication too so when you’re waiting in reception sit or stand in an alert and professional manner; no slouching, stay off your mobile phone (including texting or internet browsing) and take your surroundings in. This will help you get a feel for the company atmosphere and culture as well as keep you alert for anyone walking past, which when this does happen remember to look for eye contact and smile.

Shaking hands

Job interviews start when you shake hands, so you need to be aware of your handshake style and make sure yours is one that gives the right impression.

Grip too tightly and people will think you’re too aggressive. On the other hand (no pun intended) grip too softly and you’ll come across as too weak.

You also need to make sure you don’t open or close your palm as you offer it to people as this is a sign of either submission (open palm facing up) or control (palm facing down).\

With so much to think about why not practice with a couple of friends or family members to get their opinion on how you can alter your hand shake.

You should be focussed on using your right hand (so make sure your belongings are on your left hand side), smiling, keeping your palm at a 90 degree angle to the ground and use eye contact once you’ve made the moderate to firm grip.

Finally never cover the other person’s hand or touch them anywhere else when you meet them for the first time. This type of handshake is saved for closer relationships or else it is seen as a sign of trying to dominate the other person.

Walking through

The walk to the interview is a great opportunity for you to display some early body language and show you’re ‘the right person for this company’!

To keep things simple keep calm, smile (but not too much), take in your surroundings and try to mirror the person you’re walking with.

The message you’ll give is ‘I fit in here and will follow your lead’.

Talk about pressure!

Taking a seat at the interview table

The first thing you need to do when you sit down is either wait for the other person / people to sit or be offered to take a seat.

From here you need to get comfortable; fold up your coat nicely (if you have one) get a copy of your CV, cover letter, note pad and any other documentation you’re going to need neatly laid out on the table (I would advise you do this in one neat pile with your CV at the top and your note pad to the side) and set yourself up early with a drink of water (if there’s some available).

Place your briefcase carefully to the side of your chair too, you don’t want it under the table for people to kick!

Once you’re ready sit up straight, take a deep breath and smile; you’re ready to go!

Eye contact and hand gesturing

Eye contact is critical as you should always keep appropriate eye contact with the person or people in the room. Too little eye contact means you’ll look ‘shifty’, too much and you’ll come across as being too intense.

This means you need to look people in the eye in a natural way when they’re talking to you and vice versa. It’s also important to ensure you make eye contact with everyone in the room, so you’re not just talking to one person.

Experts recommend you should look directly into someone’s eyes for no more than a few seconds at a time, so as a rule of thumb, keeping eye contact for 3-5 seconds at a time is a good guide. Try talking through some interview questions and answers with your friends and family to see what they think about your use of eye contact.

The other thing you should think about is using your hands to help gesture and get your points across.

To do this in the interview setting you’ll need to make sure your hands are always above desk level, but below your shoulder height otherwise you won’t look relaxed.
Keep your palms open to show honesty and a relaxed manner. It also might help to sit back a little from the table to help you use your hands to gesture during the interview.

Other Interview Body Language Dos and Don’t

As you will have worked out by now, body language can be quite a complex subject. However to keep things as simple as possible here are list of body language dos and don’ts for you to consider prior to having your interview;

Do…

  • Sit all the way back in your seat
  • Plant your feet firmly on the ground
  • Breathe deeply, and speak on the exhale
  • Nod your head while listening
  • Maintain equal eye contact with all interviewers
  • Lean in at key points of interest

Don’t…

  • Slouch in your chair (either in the interview or while you’re waiting)
  • Cover your mouth when you talk
  • Move about in your chair (it makes you look like you’re nervous)
  • Try to over analyse the other person’s body language – it’ll put you off your stride!

Making your exit

Once the questions are over and it’s time to leave you just need to do a little reverse engineering and you can be on your way. So, take a breath, gather your things calmly, stand up with grace, make eye contact and smile.

Then shake hands with all the people in the room and make your way out of the room, remembering to smile and say goodbye to anyone you spoke to on your way out.
That’s it, you’re done… for now…. hopefully!

If you’re interested in looking at your career options and would like to speak to a member of the team simply call 0131 553 6644 or email connect@chasepeople.com

Kate O’Neill
Consultant – Graduate Sales Recruitment