3 Hot Jobs in Healthcare: August 2017 Part One

Every month, our vacancy page is packed with exciting jobs up for grabs from some of the biggest names in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

As always, we’re sharing three highlights to give you a taste of the hottest opportunities available right now.

Regional Sales Manager (Aesthetics)

Since our client was founded 13 years ago, their fundamental principle has been to satisfy a very demanding market by creating innovative products of the highest quality with the highest safety standards. They continue in the tradition of excellence and innovation in hyaluronic acid and are introducing several major breakthroughs. They now seek a talented Sales Manager, to drive sales on the assigned territory. You will be responsible for lead generation through to close, training customers where necessary, and developing and implementing marketing strategies to create an expanding customer base.

Very attractive basic salary, bonus and car

Location: Home counties

Apply Now


Territory Sales Manager (Woundcare)

A major player in the Wound-care and Continence marketplace are looking for a highly motivated and enthusiastic Territory Sales Representative to work covering their successful Wound-care product portfolio across their high potential South Wales territory. In this role, you will have responsibility for their cutting edge Wound-care portfolio and work across community and secondary care markets. As its sole territory manager, you will need to be a strong planner and good business management skills and also brig a strong clinical and commercial understanding to the role. Also, an ability to manage a ‘business within a business’ is also required.

In return you can expect an excellent financial package, with an excellent commission scheme and also have the chance to represent a people focused business that invests heavily in its R&D and people to stay ahead of the competition.

Location: South Wales

Apply Now


Senior Product Manager (Renal)

Our client is seeking a Senior Product Manager to take on responsibility for their Renal portfolio. In this role you will develop, execute, monitor and adapt product strategy to meet the Marketing Plan, market share and sales KPI’s. The ideal candidate will have prior product management experience in the pharmaceutical or healthcare industry and ideally some Renal knowledge.

A Highly Competitive Basic, Bonus and Benefits package will be paid.

Location: Berkshire Head Office

Apply Now

How to Exceed Your Sales Targets!

Pharma sales has never been an easy job and in more recent years it seems to have got tougher than ever to gain access to customers and reach your sales targets.

In the days before the internet, a Medical Sales Representative’s job was to inform the doctor about their product and share the latest clinical research. However nowadays if someone is interested in a drug or disease area the first thing they’re likely to do is look online to find out as much as they can. This means that your primary challenge is to provide information that the doctor doesn’t already know or can’t readily find themselves.

However like in any walk of like it’s important to think about the wider picture in terms of what will make the difference between those who are successful or not. This will involve;

  1. Being very clear about what direction you’re headed
  2. Being even clearer about what’s required to get there
  3. Working relentlessly to a routine to hit miles stones
  4. Communicating progress to key stakeholders to get feedback and course correct as needed

So let’s take a look at each of these in more detail;

Being very clear about what direction you’re headed

First of all it’s important to establish what’s important to you as a person (beyond your career).

This will probably be influenced by your stage of life and career progression to date. For newer Medical Sales Representatives at the start of their career this is likely to be focussed on establishing yourself as a medical sales person, gaining promotions and pay rises and generally setting the broad foundations for later in life.

If you are a more experienced Representative, you may well have different priorities. Do you want to stay as a Representative or do you want to try different roles?

So whatever your situation, make time to get clear on the direction you want to be headed so you know what you’re working towards. To make this really powerful you should also get clear about the reasons why this is important to you. So make sure you write it all down and refer to it regularly.

Being even clearer about what’s required to get there

We all know direction without a plan is just a dream, so once you’re clear on your direction this is where some discipline is required.

Not only do you need to know what’s required to work towards a bigger goal, you also need to know what the barriers are to getting there and proactively think about contingencies and back-up solutions so you’re always prepared.

As a Medical Sales Representative this might include things like;

  • Getting clear on the high potential geographies to prioritise
  • Finding out who the key decision makers are
  • Gaining access to them on a regular basis
  • Understanding their needs and goals
  • Having the right clinical data to share and discuss with them
  • Convincing them to prescribe your product
  • Keeping well organised systems and notes so you can refer back to things in future
  • Having time with a coach / manager to give you feedback on where you can improve
  • Keeping belief and momentum going, even if things don’t at first go your way

Working relentlessly to a routine to hit milestones

Once you have your plan, then success becomes an outcome of your routines and mentality on a day by day, week by week basis.

Routines

It’s important to review your sales target and other goals either at the end of the working day or first thing in the morning.

Start with the big picture then go through the rest of your goals and then plan the day. Make sure you consider the whole week to ensure you have your priorities in the right order. From there you can plan your day with confidence you are doing the right things.

When you get to a Friday set time to review the week just gone to see how well you have done verses your goals. You can then review what’s coming up, make course corrections to get back on track and from there you can set goals and actions for the next week. If you find you missed your activity goals by 10% then find a way to claw this back over the next week or two.

If you make these simple steps a permanent fixture in your working life you’ll find that everything flows into place as you’ll have a very high level of awareness regarding what you need to do, where you are right now and the direction you’re heading.

Mentality

Based on market research findings from speaking to almost 500 companies, The Top-Performing Sales Organization Benchmark Report, (published by RAIN Group, a global sales consulting and sales training company), shows there were a number of areas that were found to contribute to higher win rates that will help you beat your sales goals. Most of these were related to the mentality of the sales representative and here are just a few that you may want to consider building into your daily and weekly routines;

1) Set challenging goals for yourself (and be true to yourself about hitting them); given you’ve taken the time to plan, making sure your goals are going to stretch you is meaningless without the personal discipline and honesty to hold yourself accountable to them. If you fall behind on your activity targets or fail to plan your pre-call objectives during a week then pull yourself up on this and make up the lost difference. If on the other hand you find you’re always falling behind then you also need to be honest with yourself. Have you set goals that are too ambitious? Do you need some additional support from your company? This is where you need to have a really positive relationship with your manager to help you stay on track, but it starts with discipline and being true to yourself.

2) Get close to your customers; don’t think that by just telling your doctors about your product they will understand and use it when the opportunity presents itself. You need to get close to them by seeing them regularly, asking questions, showing an interest in how they make decisions and most importantly of all providing them with something of value in every interaction you have with them. Their time is precious – find out how you can help them and make time with you worth their while.

3) Focus on value; of you, your time and the product benefits; whilst your customers’ time is precious, so is yours. Make sure you get what you need out of the sales interactions you have. Create pre call objectives that focus on moving forward. These might be to find out further information about the customer’s concerns, finding a patient with them to trial your product with or simply going through some clinical data to make sure they know how to get the most out of your product. Always agree to following up with a ‘next step’ at the end of every call and see to it that you do this with rigour. Always keeping the promises you’ve made.

4) Give less away; this feeds into the value of you. Giving away your time to doctors who aren’t prepared to trial your drug or share information with you probably means you need to walk away at some point and find other doctors who are more receptive to your way of working. The secret is to know when to walk away. This needs to be judged on a case by case basis as all customers operate in different ways. Don’t judge someone on the first meeting. Take your time and be diplomatic. If after 3-4 sales calls you’re still having the same discussions then it’s probably time to take a step back. The same logic applies for anything you have to give; your time, budget, patient materials, anything. Invest wisely, your resources are limited.

5) Maximise sales to existing customers (by communicating the value you’re adding and finding new areas to generate further value (and revenue)); after you’ve sold your product you need to make time to sell the value of the outcome you’ve helped your customer achieve. In Pharma sales you can do this by gaining feedback from the doctor and showing an interest in what happens beyond the sale by asking them;

– What results have they seen from using your product?

– What has this done for their patients’ quality of life?

– How does this help your customer as a doctor?

– How can you build on this to keep supporting the doctor(s) or patient(s) across the community?

By showing you’re interested in the outcomes and not just the sale you’ll find a whole wave of other opportunities that will present themselves to keep adding value on a much wider scale.

6) Invest in sales training; this will usually be part of most Pharma companies strategic development planning. However even if it isn’t you should be constantly undergoing some form of training and development related to your work. Speak to your manager or even research the internet to learn about the different sales training courses there are out there. Never stop learning and sharpening your skills.

Communicating progress to key stakeholders to get feedback and course correct as needed

You should regularly share your goals, plans and outcomes with your manager or coach at least every month to get their feedback and input. That way they’re aware of what’s going on and more importantly, as two brains are better than one, they can help you constantly improve your planning and delivery.

It’s highly unlikely things will always go smoothly, so your manager will also be there for you to discuss challenges and issues so you know you’re not alone when the going gets tough, which it inevitably will from time to time.

Remember, you are responsible for your results. Be true to yourself and open with your manager. They are there to help you. By sharing things with them you will find a strong ally who will help you sail the course to achieving the success you’re seeking.

If you’re interested in looking at your career options and would like to speak to a member of the team simply call 0131 553 6644 or email connect@chasepeople.com

Graham Hawthorn
Managing Director

5 Tips to Help You Be a Top Performing Healthcare Sales Rep

Becoming a top performing healthcare sales rep and getting to the top of the ladder requires you to hone your skills, build on the foundation of your knowledge with first-hand client encounters and the useful advice of others.

With that in mind, we have gathered together some key tips that’ll see you performing at the top of your game.

1. Product knowledge

Trust is placed in the healthcare industry not just because of the professionalism of its staff, but because of the integrity of the products it uses. Patients want to know that they’re receiving the best service and that means your clients will have to invest in the most effective treatments.

The best sales reps have first-rate knowledge of their products. Understanding the physiology and anatomy behind every healthcare product you sell is absolutely vital.

2. Ability to Listen

A salesperson shouldn’t just be a presentation machine providing a glut of information to a client. To create a meaningful connection with your clients, you’ll have to listen to their wants and needs, and respond to those with a sense of understanding and perceptiveness.

A finely tuned sense of communication and empathy for your customers can only really be picked up on the job, and will come with time. But making sure you’re effectively understanding the needs of your clients is vital to increasing your sales performance from the get-go.

3. Awareness of the industry

The healthcare industry is constantly changing. A prominent example of this is the Lord Carter Review, a Government review of the English NHS.

The Carter Review, published in 2016, outlined plans to save up to £5 billion for the NHS with “efficiency measures”, many of which could impact the way you sell your products.

A comprehensive awareness of the report, and any other future changes in the industry, is vital to communicating on an even footing with your clients.

4. Dedicated, determined and resilient

Combining dedication, determination and resilience is the key to pushing your way to the top of the career ladder.

However, sometimes a client won’t be interested in your products. Sometimes their quarterly budget won’t be able to stretch to the product your offering. But you’ve got to try and move your business forward, so always have a plan B in your back pocket.

And remember – your clients might not need your products now, but they might need them later.

5. Professional, polite and personable

Although a sense of determination is vital to remaining at the height of your powers in the healthcare industry, remaining professional, polite and personable to each of your clients can also be the perfect way to make sure they place their trust in you.

If you’re interested in looking at your career options and would like to speak to a member of the team simply call 0131 553 6644 or email connect@chasepeople.com

Nick Johnson
UK Business Lead – Healthcare

3 hot jobs in pharma: August 2017 Part One

Every month, our vacancy page is packed with exciting jobs up for grabs from some of the biggest names in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

As always, we’re sharing three highlights to give you a taste of the hottest opportunities available right now.

Healthcare Access Manager (Oncology)

This Award Winning Pharmaceutical organisation was recently voted as one of the Best Companies to work for due to their very open people focused culture and flexible working environment. With a bustling pipeline this company are very sought after and continue to go from strength to strength. A field based role responsible for relationships with key policy decision makers in the NHS who influence the funding of products at national, regional and local levels in order to achieve sales and other key performance indicators in line with agreed Company and brand strategies. A Highly Competitive Basic, Bonus and Benefits package will be offered.

Location: S London / South East

Apply Now


Medical Sales (E-Detailing)

We are seeking an experienced Pharmaceutical Sales professional to work from home in a reduced time interactive promotional role. For this particular project the opportunity would be for 2, 3 or 4 days per week. You must be ABPI qualified and have outstanding communication and selling skills. If you have a compelling reason for working in such a role we would love to hear from you. These roles require candidates to work independently and who can demonstrate an impressive track record in pharmaceutical sales. Be part of the e Detailing revolution! A Competitive Basic and Bonus will be paid.

Location: Home based

Apply Now


Marketing Manager (Urology)

This Award Winning Pharmaceutical organisation was recently voted as one of the Best Companies to work for due to their very open people focused culture and flexible working environment. With a bustling pipeline this company are very sought after and continue to go from strength to strength. They have an exciting opportunity for a driven, experienced Marketer within the Pharma sector to join the Urology team as a Marketing Manager to develop, implement and evaluate marketing strategies for products and designated therapy area to achieve optimal product market share.

They offer:
* A challenging and diversified job in an international setting
* Good career opportunities
* Inspiring work climate
* Attractive remuneration package

Location: South East England

Apply Now

3 hot jobs in healthcare: July 2017 Part Two

Every month, our vacancy page is packed with exciting jobs up for grabs from some of the biggest names in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

As always, we’re sharing three highlights to give you a taste of the hottest opportunities available right now.

Territory Sales Manager (Surgical Instruments)

Our client is a major player in the single-use theatre device market, across the UK, Europe and the United States. In this role, you will have strategic responsibility across the assigned hospital accounts across the territory and design & implement specific ‘account plans’ across all levels of the NHS; including clinical stakeholders in theatre and purchasing decision makers. You can expect a very attractive financial and benefits package and the chance to represent an aspirational organisation with major growth plans for the next few years. Excellent Salary + Bonus + Substantial benefits package.

Location: Scotland / Northern England

Apply Now


Senior Product Manager (Renal)

Our client is seeking a Senior Product Manager to take on responsibility for their Renal portfolio. In this role you will develop, execute, monitor and adapt product strategy to meet the Marketing Plan, market share and sales KPI’s. You would develop market research projects to promote and sustain their product portfolio as well as actively managing these projects to pre agreed deliverables and budget. The ideal candidate will have prior product management experience in the pharmaceutical or healthcare industry and ideally some Renal knowledge. A Highly Competitive Basic, Bonus and Benefits package will be paid.

Location: Berkshire

Apply Now


Territory Manager (Laparoscopic devices)

CHASE is recruiting for a Territory Manager (Laparoscopy) on behalf of a rapidly expanding international medical technology company that’s committed to improving the quality of life for millions of people in the UK every day. The ideal candidate will have medical device (operating theatre) experience and a proven track record of sales success. In this role you will manage the territory as a ‘business within a business’. You will also be degree qualified and be able to demonstrate a track record of delivering success from a sales perspective. In return you can expect a very attractive financial and benefits package and the chance to represent a genuine market leader in it’s field with major growth plans for the next few years.

Location: Cambs / E Anglia

Apply Now

Why it’s Vital for Senior Level Candidates to Carefully Craft Their CVs

In a market where senior level opportunities are at a premium, it’s vital that a jobseeker in this position carefully crafts their CV to help them stand head and shoulders above the competition.

Fewer senior roles are available due to the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries increasingly contracting at second line management level and above, so the need for a polished CV is more important than ever.

Indeed, senior level candidates can’t guarantee progression to the face-to-face stage on reputation alone, so he or she needs to be able to use their CV to sell themselves – just as candidates at any other level must.

With that in mind, we asked Huw Nicholas, CHASE’s Executive Solutions Lead, what senior level candidates must do to make sure their CV avoids ending up in the shredder …

Poor Quality and Oversized CVs

According to Huw, poor quality and oversized CVs are all too common with senior level candidates, with the following items contributing to documents that would give War and Peace a run for its money:

  • Using the same CV you’ve had throughout your career: have you simply added new roles onto it as and when you’ve changed? You need to make sure your CV speaks clearly about what you’re doing NOW.
  • Packing it full of irrelevant info: ideally, your CV should only be two pages long (and a maximum or three). Be disciplined in removing a level of detail about previous roles that you will never discuss at interview (do we need to know you won an award in 1989 for call rate when you were a rep, when you’re currently a Business Unit Director of a mid-sized pharma company with a multi £million P&L?)
  • No personal profile: always include one to introduce your CV and outline your suitability for the role you’re applying for. Sharp, no more than two short paragraphs, typically written in the third person.
  • Long lists of personal achievements: especially if they’re irrelevant to the level you’re currently working at. Take them off, even if you’re still proud of them.
  • Listing every internal training course that you’ve ever attended: it’s a “given” that you take a course every year or so, but just list ones that set you apart or are recognised and well know externally delivered ones.
  • Listing every qualification you’ve ever gained: this includes O-levels by subject and grade. If you have a degree, we can assume you have O-levels/Ordinary passes.

What DO Prospective Employers Want to Know?

Now that you’ve avoided the common pitfalls, Huw offers advice on what prospective Employers DO want to know:

  • Profile/Overview: Always include a personal profile to introduce you as a candidate. Summarise your experience to date. What are you good at? What are your strongest competencies? What do you want to do?
  • Responsibilities: In your current and past roles, what are you responsible/accountable for, what are you judged on, and key achievements against those criteria. How many people report to you and what is their function? What therapy areas do you work in? Who are your customers (internal and external)?
  • Relevancy: Only provide the above level of detail for roles that are relevant to the one you are applying for. For positions at the start of your career, job title and brief overview will suffice
  • Training: Accredited external training courses only, unless you feel it is an internal course of relevance
  • Education: Degree subject/class, A-levels (number of only), any other further education qualifications

Formatting Your CV

Whilst the details contained within your CV are undoubtedly important, it’s also crucial to make sure your CV is formatted properly. Here’s Huw’s advice:

  • Keep it simple: Avoid using logos, photos and multiple “boxes” that prevent your story from flowing
  • Remember: The CV is an interview tool which markets you as a candidate. Make it impactful, including a powerful profile/overview

By following the tips above, your CV will allow a potential employer to quickly and simply understand your suitability for the role they’re recruiting for, and provide a template that allows them to interview you for that role.

For all the latest Pharma Marketing opportunities, as well as other exciting roles, remember to follow our LinkedIn page.

3 Hot Jobs in Healthcare: July 2017 Special Edition

Every month, our vacancy page is packed with exciting jobs up for grabs from some of the biggest names in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

As always, we’re sharing three highlights to give you a taste of the hottest opportunities available right now.

Sales Specialist (Gynaecology Diagnostics)

A highly regarded medical technology company are now looking for a highly motivated and enthusiastic Sales Specialist – Diagnostics to cover any of the territories below. You will be working in partnership with Healthcare Professionals at all levels across secondary care within the NHS to achieve your sales objectives. You will be expected to maintain the companies market leading position through retention of established accounts and also looking to bring in new business. You can expect an excellent financial package, with a generous commission scheme and also have the chance to represent a high performing, people-focused business with ambitious growth plans for the next few years.

East of England

Apply Now


West of England

Apply Now


London

Apply Now

5 Signs a Career in Pharma or Healthcare Sales is Ideal for You

Working in Pharmaceutical or Healthcare sales is a rewarding job with many professional and personal benefits – perfect for someone who loves forging and fostering strong professional relationships.

But if you don’t have the right temperament for this fast-paced, fluid and demanding role, it’s easy to come unstuck.

With that in mind, we’ve come up with a few signs to help you figure out if you’d suit a career in pharma or healthcare sales.

Take a look and discover the ideal personality traits you’ll need for this constantly evolving industry.

1. You want to sell

As with any sales job, you’ll have a number of targets to meet when you’re in Pharma or Healthcare sales.

Selling is the core aspect of your job, so it’s important to ask yourself: “Do I want to sell?”

As well as enjoying the highs of closing a sale, you’ll also have to decide how comfortable you are with the inevitable rejection inherent in sales. Have you got the perseverance to stick with it and really drive yourself even on the difficult days?

If you’ve got previous experience of selling successfully (even if that experience is in another industry), make sure you display your skills prominently on your CV.

2. You have high standards

In multibillion dollar industries like Pharmaceuticals and Healthcare, hiring managers will only consider the finest applicants, and they need to ensure that their Sales Representatives will present their company ethically and professionally.

The Pharmaceutical and Healthcare industries are tightly regulated, and you’ll have to appreciate the intricacies of the regulations if you want to get ahead. Therefore, if high standards of professional excellence are more important to you than a quick sale, you could be exactly who our clients are looking for.

3. You’re comfortable with science and continual learning

Although you don’t necessarily need a degree in science, having A-level/Higher qualifications in science subjects will help you. The more comfortable you are in this area the better.

In terms of core qualifications, much of your knowledge will be expanded on-the-job. You’ll have an initial training course to successfully complete and then, if you’re in Pharmaceuticals, you’ll also have to pass the ABPI examination within two years.

If you’ve got a passion for learning (and the science side of things hasn’t put you off), then you’ll fit in perfectly with the industry.

4. You want to work in an industry with a future

With Brexit and other political upheavals stoking uncertainty in many industries, we’re living in economically unstable times. But the Pharmaceutical and Healthcare industries are more relevant than ever.

Whether bringing new drugs or devices to the marketplace or finding new markets for existing products, these industries are combining science and commerce to help patients the world over.

If you’re searching for an industry that’s essentially future-proofed, then think seriously about applying.

5. You want a real career path

At CHASE, we can cite countless examples of Graduates entering the Pharma and Healthcare industries and progressing into senior roles, and we’re proud of the helping hand we provide for them.

If you’re on the hunt for a real career path AND possess all the traits above, you’re a perfect match for Healthcare and Pharma sales – please contact us and speak to our specialist Graduate Academy team to find out more.

If you’re interested in looking at your career options and would like to speak to a member of the team simply call 0131 553 6644 or email connect@chasepeople.com

Kate O’Neill
Consultant – Graduate Sales Recruitment

3 Hot Jobs in Pharma: July 2017 Part 1

Every month, our vacancy page is packed with exciting jobs up for grabs from some of the biggest names in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries.

As always, we’re sharing three highlights to give you a taste of the hottest opportunities available right now.

Key Account Manager (Mental Health)

A privately owned pharmaceutical Sales and Marketing company are looking to appoint an experienced and commercially-focussed Key Account Manager who can communicate, engage, interact and persuade stakeholders of all seniorities, and be competent to operate relatively autonomously. The role is customer facing with key healthcare professionals. Ideal candidates will have a existing Mental Health relationships with a proven track record of secondary care sales success. This is a superb opportunity to manage and shape the business around you with a supportive and cutting edge company. Very attractive basic salary, bonus and car.

Location: South UK

Apply Now


Hospital Account Manager (Oncology)

In this exciting new venture, you will launch a full pipeline of hospital based biosimilars, initially in oncology. Your suitabilty for the role will be defined by your exceptional track record of sales success from within a specialist secondary care therapy area. You will have well-honed negotiation skills, built from interacting with a diverse customer group throughout the local health economy. This role will pay a Highly Competitive Basic, Bonus and Benefits package.

Location: North West / Midlands

Apply Now


Sales Manager (E-Detailing)

Our client is part of an International PLC and employs over 140 staff and is delivering an enviable and unrivalled portfolio of healthcare intelligence products and services. In summary you would be responsible for managing a field based Business Development team, who will be selling the company’s full range of Solutions into targeted Pharmaceutical Companies. Therefore you will need to have experience in Sales Management, be a proven sales leader and be comfortable working across Marketing, Medical, Sales and Business Intelligence functions. The role will come with a Highly Competitive Basic Salary, Bonus and Benefits package.

Location: South East/London

Apply Now

Setting out your first 90 days

When you’re about to start your new job, chances are you’re feeling on top of the world. After all you were chosen above everyone else who applied, so you’ve probably had more than your fair share of compliments and ego boosts over the last few weeks. Add to that the excitement that you and your new employer have about you joining their team, and it’s understandable that you might not be thinking about how to approach this new chapter. My advice to anyone reading this blog is really think through how you should go about things once your new job starts.

Focus on the business, on competitors, on market opportunities and threats and also who you’re likely to meet in your first few weeks. Maybe do some research on line about their careers and prepare some questions you’d like to ask about the things you need to work on in order to be successful.

Once you’ve thought about the wider business, then I recommend you think about how you’re going to build a working relationship with your direct line manager.

Go into your first meetings with an open mind but also use it as the platform to check priorities with you manager and team mates. A simple way to do this is to ask;

  • What are we trying to achieve as a team?
  • What’s my role within the team?
  • What are the biggest challenges likely to be?
  • How should I prioritise and address these things?

Once you’ve got that discussion going be sure to document and email your line manager to tell them how excited you are and these are the things you’re going to be focussing on over the coming days and weeks.

Set clear direction and goals for yourself, and be sure to be seen as someone with positive energy and focus.

I often advise candidates to think about starting a new job in four time periods;

The first 30 days

We all know first impressions count, so the first 30 days in your new job are going to be some of the most important.

The first thing you need to do is get a good feel for the way things work; what’s the company culture like, how do people operate and communicate with one another and even what do people wear? In particular pay attention to those people who have been promoted within the company and if you can, ask them their advice on how to be successful.

The other thing to do is take notes on everything you do in a book called ‘First 30 Days’ (or something similar) that you can refer back to whenever you need to remember something from your induction and first few weeks.

You should also take time to have lunch or coffee with your co-workers to learn a bit about them and get to know them. This is the time to ask as many questions as you can.

Once you’ve got through all of your first meetings with the key internal people and agreed on your targets and objectives, you should take some time to build a plan for the next three months.

Make sure you share this with your manager before launching into action, and be proactive about regularly checking in with them to get their feedback on how you’re doing.

Days 30-90

Once you get into your second and third month you should have a stronger understanding of how things work and what’s required to be successful at your new company.

You should also have a good sense of who you can trust and ultimately show you the ropes and give you the honest, constructive input that will help make sure you keep fitting in and are on the right lines.

Continue to have regular check ins with your boss and ask them outright how they think you’re doing and where you can improve. It’s always best to approach your boss about your progress instead of waiting for them to speak to you, this way, you can get ahead of any issues before they arise.

Finally, it’s important to remember that you’re likely to be working through a probation period for the first six months, so by setting the stall out early on, showing initiative, asking questions and taking an overall thoughtful approach to your new job is going to stand you in great stead.

Beyond 90 days

By now you should have a good sense as to whether things are going well for you or not. You should already be showing signs that you’re on the road to success.

This is now the time to consider bringing fresh ideas to the table. My strong advice is to do this one idea at a time to prevent bombarding your manager and team mates with a range of items they’ll never likely implement.

So, choose the one thing that you think will really make a difference and focus on presenting this in an objective way so that people can see you’ve thought it through from several perspectives.

If you get agreement that’s great, but more realistically you may have to amend your idea based on feedback from the team. Agree an implementation plan, and then stick to this so people can see the tangible outcome of your thoughts and the value you’re bringing to the company.

Alternatively, if things are not going too well don’t get too disheartened. It’s still early days and after all the first few months of being at a new company can often be challenging. It can take a little time to find your momentum in new surroundings.

Rather than worry, double your focus on what it takes to be successful and make sure your manager is helping you to prioritise. Remember, you were selected ahead of everyone else for this job and keep faith in your own ability. With hard work, proper focus and a positive attitude you will make it work!

If you’re interested in looking at your career options and would like to speak to a member of the team simply call 0131 553 6644 or email connect@chasepeople.com

Helen Weller
Senior Recruitment Consultant; SW London / Surrey / Hampshire / Dorset